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Talent Management Excellence Essentials January 2015

The Orientation Process and constantly changing as their experience of the organization changes.” (Jones, G.R.1983). Isolation and misunderstanding can sometimes be a result of the new employee’s ambivalence toward the organizational expectations. New employees may isolate themselves from the expectations of the organization by creating a “cocoon of safety” within their environment. They may structure their environment in a way that will enhance their sense of stability and enable them to function effectively alone and isolated from the pressures of the organization. This isolation can only enhance their ineffectiveness to understand the complexity of the organization. “Over the past two decades, the focus of organizational socialization research has shifted, changing from a primary with the influence of organizational actions on newcomers’ adjustment through to investigating the effects of individual newcomer actions and perceptions, and in particular newcomer acquisition” (Anderson & Thomas, 1996; Bauer, Morrison, & Calisher, 1998; Morrison, 1993; Saks & Ashforth,1997) The organization does not necessarily prevent the new employee from understanding the obvious routines and procedures required of the new individual, however, the hidden agendas that exist within the organization often intimidate the employee and that intimidation impedes the new person’s ac-climation in the process. Occasionally, new individuals may choose to affiliate with other members of the organization in an effort to gain accep-tance and to gain some knowledge of the socialization process. Unfortunately, the individuals with whom the new employee may develop an alliance are often the disenfranchised staff members. This alliance is easily accessed by the new employee as many of the disenfranchised individuals in the organization welcome allegiance and interest in their perspective of the socialization responsibilities. This relationship can further hinder the new individual from acclimating to the organization as misinforma-tion is often provided to the new employee through this new allegiance. The orientation process is an important asset to the organiza-tion’s effective development of successful candidates, however, the effectiveness of a new employee orientation process can be affected by specific constraints. Organizations often do not allocate sufficient funds to implement adequate orientation ac-tivities. Trained personnel are often not available to implement an effective orientation process. This impact of the organizational socialization process on the new employee should be considered as one of the obstacles in the successful acclimation process of a new employee in an organization. The organization must recognize the existence of the “organizational socialization process.” Individuals in the or-ganization are often not aware of the social intricacies that exist among participants of the organization. Conversations between stakeholders in the organization regarding communication, orientation and introduction with and of new employees, could facilitate a working knowledge of the process. “Socialization is a form of control that is both process and outcome.” (Alvesson & Robertson, 2006). When incumbent individuals within the organization understand the group dynamics in effect, they can begin to address the specific needs of the organization with respect to developing a process that will enhance the acclima-tion of new employees in their positions within the organization and thus facilitate an improved acclimation process for new employees. ITM References Alvesson, M., and M. Robertson (2006). The best and the brightest: The construction, significance, and effects of elite identities in consulting firms. Organizations, 13: 195-224. Anderson, N., & Thomas, H.D.C. (1996). Work group socialization. In M.A. (Ed), Handbook of work groups (pp. 423-450). Chichester: Wiley. Ashforth, B.E., Sluss, D.M., & Saks, A.M. (2007). Socialization tactics, proactive behavior and newcomer learning: Integrating socialization models. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 70, 447-462. Bauer, T.N., & Green, S.G. (1998). Testing the combined effects of newcomer information seeking and manager behavior on socialization. Journal of Applied Psychology, 83, 72-83 Bauer, T.N., Bodner, T., & Tucker, J.S. (2007). Newcomer adjustment during organizational socialization: A meta-analytic review of antecedents, outcomes and methods. Journal of Applied Psychology, 92, 707-721. Bauer, T.N., Morrison, E. W., & Callister, R.R. (1998). Organizational socialization: A review and directions for future research. In G.R. Ferris & K.M. Rowland (Eds.), Research in personnel and human resource management, Vol. 16. Greenwich, CT: JAI Press. Brim, O.G., Jr. (1996). Socialization through the life cycle. In O.G. Brim & S. Wheeler (Eds.), Socialization after childhood: Two essays (pp. 3-49). New York: John Wiley. Jones, G.R. (1983). Psychological orientation and the process of organizational socialization: An interactionist perspective. Academy of Management Review, 8, 464-474. Jones, G.R. (1986). Socialization, tactics, self-efficacy, and newcomers’ adjustments to orga-nizations. Academy of Management Journal, 29, 262-279. Louis, M.R. (1980) Surprise and sense making: What newcomers experience in entering unfamiliar organizational settings. Administrative Science Quarterly, 25, 226-251. Ostroff, C., & Kozlowski, S.W.J. (1992). Organizational socialization as a learning process: The role of information acquisition. Personnel Psychology, 45, 849-874. Saks, A.M., & Ashforth, B.E. (1997a). Organizational socialization: Making sense of the past and present as a prologue for the future. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 51, 234-279. Tormina R.J. (1997). Organizational socialization: A multidomain, continuous process model. International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 5(1), 29-47. Van Maanen, J., & Schein, E.H. (1979). Toward a theory of organizational socialization. In B. M. Staw (Ed.), Research in organizational behavior (pp. 209-264). Greenwich, CT: JAI. Dr. Stephen Benigno is an Assistant Professor at Texas A&M International University. He has been employed as a shift supervisor on a pipeline reclama-tion crew, he worked as a Station Dispatcher for a major airline, he has managed a restaurant and he has worked in public and private education as a teacher and an administrator. He now teaches courses in educational adminis-tration at Texas A&M International University in Laredo, Texas. Email sbenigno@tamiu.edu  Follow @DrBenigst “New employees may isolate themselves from the ex-pectations of the organization by creating a “cocoon of safety” within their environment. They may struc-ture their environment in a way that will enhance their sense of stability and enable them to function effectively alone and isolated from the pressures of the organization. Talent Management excellence essentials presented by HR.com | 01.2015 Submit your Articles 19


Talent Management Excellence Essentials January 2015
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