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FEATURE Compliance Predictions Inspired By Social Media For people working in human resources and compliance, predicting – and avoiding - the next land mine is always part of the job. This year, the rise and dominance of social media will shape how you reach and influence employees – and how you plan and execute an effective compliance program. The Rise of Social Media in Compliance The rise of social media is hardly new news – but the statistics are mind bending. In a world of 7.3B people, there are 2.3B active social media users – an increase of 176M last year alone.   Social media is also changing the way your audience expects to find, digest and validate information. According to the Pew Research Center, a majority of U.S. adults – 62% – gets news from social media while Adweek says that more than 90% of retailers use multiple social media outlets to deliver polished, media-driven marketing messages.   Compliance Organizations need to keep up Prediction No. 1:  From Rules-Based Compliance to Media-inspired Messaging At some level, compliance has always been and will always need to be about following the rules. There are simply some kinds of behavior that are not acceptable, and compliance programs need to clearly identify those behaviors. However, compliance professionals are more than policemen, and there will never be enough compliance professionals to police all of the employees all of the time in a given organization. That means your message needs to go beyond simply stating the rules. You need to think about how to modulate and deliver your message in a way that influences the behaviors of your audience. In the coming year, look for programs that use media and social media tools to create a dynamic compliance message and brand. Social media vehicles like Twitter can serve as both an avenue to influence and a guide for what to say (ex: witty or provocative). Compliance professionals should consider the moments that kept them hooked on their favorite social media sites, and then co-opt them to build a compliance brand and message. Prediction No. 2:  A New Definition for “Interactive Training” Compliance training – particularly online training – has traditionally been a one way transmission. We tell employees the rules, and they listen. However, in a world of social media, employees expect a conversation, not a lecture. They want a chance to be heard and to hear what fellow employees think. This doesn’t mean you have to sit down with each employee or shift away from widely used and cost-effective online solutions. It does mean that you need shift the format of the training by giving employees a chance to engage with you and fellow learners from inside the training.   The challenge for 2107 is to begin creating a learning and compliance “community” that provides avenues for learners to share their thoughts with their employers, the compliance team and - just as importantly - with fellow learners.   This fundamentally changes the learning experience for employees and the nature of engagement for compliance professionals. Look for this trend in online courses and across your compliance program. Prediction No. 3:  The Growth of Audience-created Content The combination of social media and mobile devices has spawned a revolution in audience-created content. Indeed, part of the draw and power of social media is its capacity to provide the average person with a platform to share videos, photos and opinions.   What does this mean for training professionals? It tells you that your audience wants – and expects – to be able to share in creating your message. This offers tremendous potential to increase the adoption and spread of your compliance message. In fact, “your” message becomes “our” message, making it easier to deliver and more likely to be genuinely adopted. Of course, there are limits to how far this can go in a work environment, but expect to see a greater emphasis on compliance activities that reflect actual, company-specific employee concerns, questions and opinions – not just generic or contrived “examples” of employee questions or concerns. Prediction No. 4:  The Birth of Training “Programs” and the Death of the Training “Event” The trend towards shorter training sessions has been around for a long while. First generation online compliance courses were almost universally one hour in length. Today’s courses are generally much shorter, reflecting both the needs of employers and the tastes of learners.   The problem is that we too often still see training as an “event,” not a program.  That makes sense when training is a one hour course delivered every other year. But it becomes increasingly unworkable as trainings get shorter and shorter.   The answer? Expect to see a greater emphasis on a layered, holistic approach to training. Think of training as an iterative program, not a single event. This may include a larger number of much shorter training engagements and a reliance on a number of messaging channels, ranging from online training segments to micro-learning bursts and even email and leader messaging. Into the New Year Big picture? Times and expectations have changed. Early in the compliance revolution, lawyers would tell you that they didn’t care if anyone learned anything in a compliance course. They just wanted to be able to tell judges and regulators that the company had provided employees with the required information.   Today’s professionals are tasked with actually producing results in employee understanding, attitudes and behavior. Your colleagues in the marketing department have been working on this problem for a very long time, and they understand social media-inspired lessons as the key to success. You should too. Look for them in 2017. T&D Scott Schneider is the Senior Workforce Strategist at Emtrain. Visit www.emtrain.com Follow @Emtrain Would you like to comment? Top 4 predictions for 2017 By Scott Schneider Training and Development Excellence Essentials presented by HR.com | 04.2017 Submit your Articles 25


T&D_APRIL2017
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