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Training: What’s The Point? Getting buy-in for training When I worked in the hospitality industry, my co-workers and I sat through many trainings: customer service, safety, phone etiquette, harassment and cultural sensitivity. We were mandated and paid to attend, but were we engaged? NO. The problem was we were being talked at- not talked to. The trainer read from a script, illustrated with PowerPoint slides and wrapped up with a summary. This format sent the following messages: • Training is boring and we know it • Don’t question or challenge • We don’t care, so why should you? If you want to engage workers, you’ll need to scrap this tired old format and effectively prepare for trainings. Here’s how: 1- Share the Information Don’t read from the script. This screams out: I don’t know what I’m saying and I don’t care enough to figure it out. Take the time to read and understand the material and share it in your own words. Find something(s) of interest and point it out to workers. Ask them: What do you think about this? 2- Scan and Tune-in Scan the room and tune in to what you see - both negative and positive. For example, you may see that Jane looks confused, and Joe is engaged and on board. Say: Jane, you look confused. (wait a bit for Jane’s response). Joe- looks like you got it. Could you help us out here? If people look bored and frustrated, acknowledge this: Looks like you know this already. (wait for response). The material may be repetitive and/or workers don’t see the point (how do I use this in my work?). Here’s their chance to tell you that. You’ve shown that you notice and care - things are not going well - tell me why and let’s fix it. 3- Be Purposeful Training needs to be about the WHY (purpose), and not just the WHAT (content). In a diversity training, for example, workers learn about other cultures - traditions, behaviors and beliefs - that’s the WHAT. Now you need to tell workers WHY. Answer their questions: How do I use this info? What’s in it for me? Relationship with co-workers improve (less friction on team projects), fewer conflicts with supervisor, less stress in managing staff. These specific answers spell out the benefits for workers. Now they have a strong reason(s) to invest and buy-in. Follow these guidelines to engage workers and increase participation in trainings. When you’re prepared and invested, giving them a strong reason to buy-in - they’ll get on board. Taking the ride together puts you on track to an effective and beneficial training - for ALL. T&D With a background in social work and two decades of experience as a union worker, Laura MacLeod, LMSW, created From The Inside Out Project with all levels of employment in mind to assist in maintaining a harmonious workplace. Laura teaches conflict resolution, problem solving and listening skills and has been interviewed for CBSMoneywatch.com and Refinery29. com. Laura is also adjunct professor in graduate studies at the Hunter College Silberman School of Social Work CUNY. Connect Laura MacLeod Would you like to comment? By Laura MacLeod Training and Development Excellence Essentials presented by HR.com | 04.2017 Submit your Articles 23


T&D_APRIL2017
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