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Technology Enabled Learning Excellence Essentials January 2015

E-Learning Jargon What you might think it is By Craig Weiss As many of you are aware, the e-learning world is well known for its jargon. In turn, it is this jargon that can create confusion and misunderstanding not only for newbies into the space, but also for hardened veterans. While it would be so much simpler if everyone used the same ter-minology – consumer world equal to e-learning world, that would be too easy and as anyone who has even put their toes into the online learning world say, easy is a word that is rarely afforded. Gamification and Gaming I am quite sure you have heard the term “gamification”. It is every-where you look, at trade shows, in publications, and on various net sites. It is raved about, talked about, fought about, and even negated by some who think it is a passing fad (why is this not surprising?). Even folks who are quite knowledgeable about the term, may be in for a shock – because that term you read about so often is refer-ring to gamification on the workplace, F2F (face-to-face) training or in classroom – AND what the industry identifies as gamification: The Training and EDTech World Gamification among other things involves gaming ele-ments.   Remember those two words – gaming elements. The E-Learning World Gamification as of right now, does not truly include gaming ele-ments - Oh sure some might say that to be the case, but in reality, well: If a platform says they have gamification, it means that they have at least one of the following items: • Rewards, • Points/incentives, • Leader board Some have all three, and those are the systems you want; in general e-learning tool area, the term usually refers to the same options: rewards, points/incentives, leader board. The spin is that you can accrue points by reading an article, taking a course, leaving comments, ranking content, completing an assess-ment and so on – varies among vendors. Hence, some vendors might pitch “gaming elements”, but there is no way – the point above – is what the rest of the world sees as gaming elements. Gaming Elements In the e-learning world, gaming elements are directly tied to games. When I discuss trends in the space, I explicitly will state “gamification” as one trend, and “games” as another. This is because I see them as two different and separate entities, and as of right now, that is how the industry sees it as well. If someone says to me, you can create game courses, then it has some type of actual game elements. Now is it fun? Well, that is whole other story. The same applies to those who have created e-learning games. No offense, but some look like C-64 games, text based from the late 80s-early 90s, OR CGA fair. On the other hand, they may use templates, I mean playing “glossary” or “jeop-ardy” is so awesome – I could play for at least 30 seconds. Video Here is the term that is kicking folks in the face. In order to un-derstand the industry as a whole, one item you must realize – behind the times. That is to say, as a whole the e-learning industry, especially authoring tools and LMS/learning systems are often two steps back, when everyone else or at least the masses are one step forward. If you are an early adopter as a consumer, you are about 10 steps forward. This is why you see the gaming issue – Guess how many authoring tools can create 100% real game based courses? Several. Universal? Heck no. With video it only gets worse.  Not from the angle that no one includes video, they do – rather it is the term itself that means different things to the industry. In the Consumer Market World Video refers usually to someone shooting video via their smartphone, tablet, digital camera or digital video camera. You take said video and either view it on your device, maybe TV, share with it with others, post it on sites and so on.  Ahh… but in the e-learning world Especially in the LMS/Learning Systems space, the term takes on a whole new meaning: • It can be referred to a screen recording of something and then saved as a .MP4, .AVI and so on • It comes from YouTube or Vivemo or similar, and then embedded in a course or directly into your learning platform or maybe just right within the sites themselves; in the EDTECH space – YouTube rules • With Video Learning Platforms – video can be what the con-sumer market identifies as video (usually the case) and yes, equally screen recordings • For the masses of the e-learning audience, people do not shoot video at a production facility or have one in house; but some do • Some people might convert their PPT to a video (it can be done) OR they have that production facility and shoot their own high quality videos OR they purchase third party content video courses Another super example of the video dilemma goes back to the sharing of video with friends, posting it on sites and so on. In this approach, the person or persons shoots the video can upload right from the device (depending on the device).  BUT in the e-learning world, especially in RCATs (Rapid Content Authoring Tools) and the vast majority of LMS/learning systems, “While it would be so much simpler if everyone used the same terminology – consumer world equal to e-learning world, that would be too easy and as anyone who has even put their toes into the online learning world say, easy is a word that is rarely afforded. Technology Enabled Learning excellence presented by HR.com | 01.2015 Submit your Articles 9


Technology Enabled Learning Excellence Essentials January 2015
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