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Technology Enabled Learning Excellence Essentials January 2015

Training Sins not only disagree, but also share information and compromise. In addition, it is important that the learners see the real worth of the learning program. If their managers cannot convince them that they need to learn and perform correctly, then they will probably never learn to perform or once they complete the learning program, they will probably not put their newly learned skills and knowledge to full use. People will most often perform what their managers expect them to do, while forgetting what the managers least emphasize. Thus, you must have the leaders not only in the initial plan-ning and analysis stage, but also have them discuss the pro-posed solution with their followers in order to get their buy-in. 4. Failing to Identify the Correct Setting for the Learning Process One of the major misconceptions of ADDIE or ISD is that it was created to only build classroom training environments, yet the reality is that it emphasizes other solutions first — you should too. A few of the guidelines for choosing instructional settings are: Use a Performance Aid (mLearning, job aid, electronic performance support system) if: • Close supervision is not required • The task follows a set procedure, has a flow to it, or contains information that does not need to be memorized • The performance aid can be followed while performing the task Do not use if: • Bad consequence may occur if inadequate performance is high • Employees lack prerequisite skill • The task requires high psychomotor skills Use e-learning or social learning if: • Close supervision is not required • The task can be self-learned by an individual or group • The material required for training can be adequate designed as a stand-alone package Do not use if: • Task failure would result in injury or damage • Special facilities or equipment is required Use On-the-Job-Training (OJT) if: • Close supervision is required • Task can be learned by individual or groups in the workplace • Task decay rate is very high Do not use if: • Sufficient equipment is not available for learners to practice on • Workplace cannot absorb the learners adequately • Training would be disruptive to normal operations Use Mentoring or Job Experience if: • Basically the same as OJT, except close supervision is not required Do not use if: • Coaching and some supervision cannot be provided on an as-needed basis Use Classroom if: • A large group must be taught the same thing • Task difficulty requires a high state of training (task is difficult and requires time to acquire skills through practice) • Learner interaction is required (such as team training) • Material required for training cannot economically be placed in the field • Essential the employee be able to perform upon job entry (high consequence if employees are inadequate performers) Do not use if: • Task may be adequately trained elsewhere “It is important that the learners see the real worth of the learning program. If their man-agers cannot convince them that they need to learn and perform correctly, then they will probably never learn to perform. 5. Failing to Include Enough Activities and Practice Time to Reinforce Skills Instructional designers often spend an enormous amount of time on creating a learning process or program, but fail to realize how much time and energy it actually took them to learn the task, so they end up building beautiful programs... except for one minor detail — the learning process lacks enough activities and practice to adequately build skills. Too much practice builds over-learning, which is a good thing (it’s what the U.S. military does to ensure warriors can perform in highly complex situations). Too little practice causes major gaps in performance. Which one do you prefer? 6. Failing of the Learning and Development Team to Learn from Their Successes and Failures Instructional designers often attend several conferences or workshops a year, and learn from others through reading or social networks, yet fail to evaluate their projects to determine the level of success or failure. Thus, while they may be learning, they have no idea if they are learning the right things. One of the best tools for this is the After Action Review. At the very least, evaluate your training and learning processes by waking-around the workplace and see how the learners (who should be performers by now) are actually performing, and if their supervisors are satisfied with the results. And use Chris Argyris’ Double Loop Learning to maximize your learning opportunities. What are your deadly sins for training? TEL This article originally appeared here. Published with author’s permission. Donald Clark is founder of Big Dog, Little Dog. Donald consults, creates and delivers learning processes (both classroom training and elearning). He also provides train-the-trainer and train-the-instructional designers classes. Donald is the winner of the MERLOT 2013 Classics Award for developing an outstanding, peer reviewed online resource. Visit nwlink.com/~donclark Connect Donald Clark 6 Submit your Articles Excellence Essentials presented by HR.com | 01.2015


Technology Enabled Learning Excellence Essentials January 2015
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