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Technology Enabled Learning Excellence Essentials January 2015

Training Sins The six deadly ones By Donald Clark While there are dozens of ways to lessen the positive impact of training, these six failures are often the worst offenders. 1. Failing to align Training Goals with Business Goals When Training Magazine (2004) surveyed senior executives about the most important training initiatives, • 77% cited, “aligning learning strategies with business goals” • 75% cited, “ensuring learning content meets workforce require-ments” • 72% cited, “boosting productivity and agility” However, as the chart below shows (Trolley, 2006), most training activities spend very little of their time investigating and showing their customers how their efforts add value to their clients (see Per-formance Analysis): Business Linkage Planning and Design & Measurement Development Delivery & Reinforcement Analysis Percentage of time spent on designing training The failure of instructional designers to meet the business unit’s expectations is normally not a lack of time, but rather a mentality of, “build it and they will come” rather than, “identify the opportunities to improve the business”. 2. Failing to Identify the Type of Performance Problem Customer often perceive that all performance problems are training problems, and in turn, instructional designers fail to question if the problem is really a lack of training. Thus, there is a real need to fully analyze the problem in order to determine its root cause. When facing a performance problem, two questions need to be asked: • “Do the employees have adequate job knowledge and skills?” • “Do the employees have the proper attitude (desire) to perform the job?” Their answers will place the employees in one of four performance quadrants in the chart on the right side: The quadrant that they land in informs you of the performance initiative required: Quadrant A (Motivation): If the employee has sufficient job knowledge, but has an improper attitude, this may be classed as a motivational problem. The consequences (rewards) of the person’s behavior will have to be adjusted. This is not always bad as the em-ployee COVER ARTICLE Does the employee have adequate job knowledge? Does the employee have the Proper attitude(desire) to Perform the job? just might not realize the consequence of his or her actions. Quadrant B (Resource/Process/Environment): If the employee has both job knowledge and a favorable attitude, but performance is unsatisfactory, then the problem is out of control of the employee. Some examples are, a process or procedure needs to be improved, lack of resources or time, or the work station is not ergonomically designed. Quadrant C (Selection): If the employee lacks both job knowledge and a favorable attitude, that person may be improperly placed in the position. This may imply a problem with employee selection or promotion, and suggests that a transfer or discharge be considered. Quadrant D (Training): If the employee desires to perform, but lacks the requisite job knowledge or skills, then learning needs to occur, such as performance aids, training, coaching, etc. 3. Failing to get Support from the Leadership Team Customers often view outside activities as meddlers who interrupt their daily flow of work. These clients are often on the defensive, and hide their true feelings and facts. During the planning and analysis phase you must bring the leaders in on the learning design activities and make them part of the solution (this collaboration is often called a matrix team or cross-functional team). The customers of a proposed learning/training initiative must be extensively involved in the con-struction of any new project. Besides introducing the customers and the training activity to each other, the other major benefit is that the customers will accept and benefit from a system that they themselves helped to define and solve. Often, nobody knows the system’s learning requirements better than the people who own and work in it... and it often takes the help of your guidance to draw this information out. This collaborative process does not mean agreeing with everything others say as this leads to group-think or the Abilene Paradox. You want the team members to Technology Enabled Learning excellence presented by HR.com | 01.2015 Submit your Articles 5


Technology Enabled Learning Excellence Essentials January 2015
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