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Technology Enabled Learning Excellence Essentials January 2015

Vol.2 Issue. 01 Technology Enabled Learning Excellence is published monthly by HR.com, 124 Wellington Street East Aurora, Ontario Canada L4G 1J1 Internet Address: www.hr.com Submissions & Correspondence: Please send any correspondence, articles, letters to the editor, and requests to reprint, republish, or excerpt articles to: HR.com 124 Wellington Street East, Aurora, Ontario Canada L4G 1J1. Phone: 1-877-472-6648 For customer service, or information on products and services, call 1-877-472-6648 Technology Enabled Learning Excellence Publishing: Debbie McGrath, CEO, HR.com Publisher Shelley Marsland-Beard, Product Manager Brandon Wellsbury, Corporate Sales Adnan Saleem, Design and Layout Marketing Offices: HR.com 124 Wellington Street East Aurora, Ontario Canada L4G 1J1 1-877-472-6648 Copyright © 2015 HR.com No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form without written permission from the publisher. Quotations must be credited To submit articles for future issues of Technology Enabled Learning Excellence Publication submit your article here: TEL@editor.hr.com Making a difference in 2015 The New Year is upon us. It is an opportunity to approach our goals with renewed vigor. Before charging forward, it is helpful to pause and ob-jectively reflect on this past year. Ask yourself, “What difference did I make in 2014?” Did you make a difference? Of course you did! But can you clearly articulate it? Perhaps you find it easy to express your con-tribution on an individual-level, but what about from an organizational perspective? For many of us in L&D, showing how we impact the business is our biggest challenge and it affects how other parts of the organization view us. I’ve heard many L&D professionals express frustration at not having a seat at the business table. One reason may be that we often com-municate in L&D language. Does the head of sales really care about the number of people who completed xyz training? Maybe. However, s/he will show great interest if we can link that train-ing to critical sales figures. And that is precisely the type of thing we need to do. Too often, when trying to quantify the posi-tive impact of L&D, we quote statistics such as enrollments, completions, training hours, etc. While this information is important to our own understanding of L&D operational efficiency, it doesn’t communicate true business significance. For many organizations, results are defined and measured by Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) that revolve around areas such as sales, quality, cost, turnover, and customer satisfaction. Al-though this information is difficult to attain, and often the link between training and KPIs is corollary rather than causal, we must make the effort to define and identify business impact. Otherwise, we run the risk of L&D being seen as a nice-to-have function, but one without real strategic impact. And that’s how this month’s issue of Technology Enabled Learning Excellence Essentials is ready to help. You’ll hear from experts about important trends, and you’ll gain practical insight to help you demonstrate the impact of learning. Hot topics from 2014 continue to gain mo-mentum in 2015 including mobile, social, gami-fication and video. Gauri Reyes explains why mobile is important, and it should be part of every learning strategy. Heera Edwin validates this approach by exploring how mobile learning can succeed in instances where traditional and online learning fail. For L&D professionals who have a keen interest in social learning, but have not yet figured out a way to leverage its potential, Pam Boiros covers eight foundational “truths” to assist you launch social learning. Then, Andrew Hughes looks at top reasons why gamification has the ability to boost business and motivate employees. To top off the look at trends, Stuart Patterson reviews best practices for using video to make internal communication easier. With so much focus on technology, we need to remember the human element. Jeremy Francis emphasizes this point by making a case for in-creased coaching in the workplace. Larraine Segil advocates coaching as a way for women to break through the glass ceiling and drive their growth within corporations. Both authors agree on the foundational importance of coaching for driving performance and developing leaders. This month’s issue also offers practical L&D advice. Ansie Snyders outlines criteria to ensure delivery of quality programs. P Medved advises on how to develop your first training course. Vishal Shah shares why organizations should not invest in Hollywood production content for internal training. And Craig Weiss clears up confusion and misunderstanding related to e-Learning jargon. Lastly, there are several articles that focus on L&D impact. Donald Clark highlights the six deadly sins that lessen the positive impact of training. Trey Tramonte speaks about learning analytics and how to optimize an LMS knowl-edgebase through social channels for the biggest organizational impact. Joanna G. Jones looks at year-round strategies to keep customer service employees motivated and engaged to ensure cus-tomer loyalty. As we look at all the potential initiatives on our plate for 2015, we need to ensure that we identify, measure and communicate business impact of each initiative. So, as you roll-out your strategy, goals and action plan for 2015, think about what your answer will be 12 months from now when asked, “What impact did you have in 2015?” Have a great year! Guest Editor’s Note Kenneth Fung became Senior Director Strategy of Learning Technologies following Infor’s acqui-sition of CERTPOINT Systems Inc. in March 2013. Fung is responsible for Infor’s learning technologies strategy, analyst relations and partnerships and alliances. He counts among his many achievements the establishment of business ‘rapprochement’ between American and Chinese enterprises, the successful promotion of American commercial interests across Russia, and a consistent delivery of results-driven best practices for global learning. Connect Kenneth Fung Visit www.infor.com


Technology Enabled Learning Excellence Essentials January 2015
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