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Technology Enabled Learning Excellence Essentials January 2015

Coaching within Organizations The better you are, the more you need it By Jeremy Francis Why is it that in the sporting world the best teams would never play against competitors without their coach being ever present? Why do individual golfers, tennis players or athletes meet their coaches almost daily? How is it that the best performers demand more and more from their personal coaches? Yet, in business we obtain qualifications and think “that’s it!” We participate in training programs and then try, on our own, to put our new-found knowledge and skills to work (and usually fail). We go it alone, until we fail, and then it’s too late. Why, oh why, do we not individually and corporately see the need for coaching in our business lives? Pressures It’s not that we are without pressures, there are plenty of them! • Organizations are constantly down-sizing, delayering and right-sizing. Increased pressure and demanding workloads for everyone are now the norms. • Structures are continually changing, and spans of control are increasing. Managers quickly need to obtain high performance from new and often larger teams. • Employees see their employability dependent on their market-ability. They are often pressing their managers for learning and personal growth opportunities. • Customers are more demanding. Employees need to be more empowered to satisfy their needs. • Old, autocratic styles of management are not tolerated. The enlightened employee is looking for a manager who coaches versus controls. These and other pressures are driving the need for more coaching within organizations like never before. However, there are dangers, the chief of which is not aligning an individual’s coaching needs to the organization’s business needs. Alignment Alignment of personal coaching needs, to the requirements of the business, is key for the following reasons: • Learning/growing/satisfied employees willingly give their best in their jobs. • Confidence in personal employability/marketability overcome the fear of job security. • Innovative ideas for the business spring from expanding think-ing of employees. • Personal coaching encourages true employee accountability/ responsibility. This in turn generates a greater sense of ownership of, and commitment to, the business. • Empowerment from coaching can produce real win-win out-comes for coachees and the business as they learn together. • Staying the same is dangerous for both employees and the busi-ness. Changing together needs to be the key objective. • Coaching needs to be built on mutual trust, and mutual trust needs to be built on mutually achievable goals. • Employers and employees may need employment contracts to protect one another. However, it is the ‘emotional’ coaching contract that causes both to grow together. Alignment in a sense is the coaching contract between the individual and the business. The intention is for both to benefit from the provi-sion of coaching, not just the coachee. So what is coaching? Coaching Definitions As you might expect there is more than one view as to the definition of coaching. Look at these definitions however, and they are likely to embrace the following content. Coaching is: • Action oriented, with a focus on future, improved performance. • A skillful dialog to assist the learning and development of another. • About changing the paradigm, mindset, and self- motivation of the coachee. • Based on a relationship of trust and commitment. • Ongoing, enabling individuals to achieve their full potential. In addition to these different definitions, there are also different types of coaching. There are basically six. 1. Business Coaching Organizational development, changes brought about by mergers and acquisitions, as well as cultural change programs often prompt organizations to introduce business coaching to support and reinforce new corporate directions. The coaching provided is closely linked with organizational change initiatives in order to help employees to accept and adapt to changes in line with their personal values and goals. The use of this type of coaching can enhance morale, motivation, and productivity and reduce employee turnover at times of potential doubt, uncertainty, and insecurity. The coaching may be provided by internal coaches or external coaching professionals. 2. Executive Coaching There is a great deal of overlap between business and executive coach-ing. Both are used to effect individual and organizational change, and both seek to achieve an alignment of personal and corporate goals. The key differences between business and executive coaching are that Executive Coaches typically: • Focus on individual change versus corporate change needs. • Work in steady state situations as well as at times of organiza-tional change. • Coach ‘high-flyers’ or with those who have potential to be a high flyer. • Work at senior management or CEO level. • Maintain total confidentiality. 3. Performance Coaching Coaching for performance enhancement in a given area, rather than the correction of a performance issue, is the focus of performance coaching. Performance is the key pay-back that both individual and organization are looking for. The coaching might include balancing work and home life, but it will be with the ultimate aim to increase the coachee’s effectiveness and productivity at work. The roots of performance coaching tend to lie in models from busi-ness and sports psychology as well as general management theories. 4. Skills Coaching or Tutoring Skills coaching is similar to one-to-one training. One could regard Technology Enabled Learning excellence presented by HR.com | 01.2015 Submit your Articles 25


Technology Enabled Learning Excellence Essentials January 2015
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