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Technology Enabled Learning Excellence Essentials January 2015

Video for Communication 3 best practices By Stuart Patterson Video is everywhere. Virtually everyone carries a device with them that can capture, edit, and publish video content, making it instantly accessible to anyone around the world. For enterprises, the promise of video as a platform for internal communications is strong, and getting stronger every day. Enterprises have seen a dramatic increase in the use of video as a communication tool for everything from online training to employee research and corporate announcements. In fact, according to Cisco, the sum of all forms of video will exceed 86% of global consumer internet traffic by 2016. And according to Gartner, the amount of video in organizations is increasing at rates varying from 50% to 200%, annually. Why the trend? Messages can be presented in a way that is not possible with text or static imagery alone. According to a research by h.engage, a company that runs employee programs, videos had an engagement range of 40% to 69% — the highest out of all the channels they studied, including newsletters and posters. Knowing all of this, we at RAMP have assembled the best practices for using video in internal communica-tions as well as a few tips for achieving higher video quality. Best Practices for using Video in Internal Communication Use videos for many different types of internal communication. The most mature companies use video for an average of 7.9 different types of internal communication, compared with the least mature who use video for less than three purposes. That means the most advanced companies have found almost three times as many ways to use video to communicate with their employees. “Cultivate a video-based culture by starting small — pick one department or region to be the test unit for rolling out more aggressive use of video, and promote their success to other groups to gain alignment and traction. Make it easy to organize and find. The most advanced companies have great processes and technologies in place for tagging video and for searching through those tags. According to Gartner, in 2017 the best results for more than 50% of searches will not be a textual docu-ment. Between 65% to 80% of companies, with the most mature video ecosystems, make it easy for their employees to find the video content they need. Encourage employees to create their own videos. Work through concerns around consistency and production quality because video is such an effective format for communicating ideas that the benefits of democratizing video within their organizations outweigh the risks. Create a culture that values video content. Create fun, short videos — even if it lacks polish. In today’s society, people only pay attention in short bursts. However, they still want to be engaged. One way to engage them is with fun videos. So once your company is on board with using more video for internal communications and employee training, how do you produce higher quality video? Here are a few of our suggestions. Tips for Achieving Better Video Video creation costs can be slashed by empowering individuals to create videos with equipment they carry with them. Look for video management and distribution solutions that eliminate time-consuming and costly manual tagging and transcription to ensure videos can be searched for and discovered — not just by their title, but also by the rich content contained in the audio transcripts of the videos themselves. Look for video management and distribution solutions that integrate into your existing content management systems and take advantage of their methodology for access and authentication. Preventing your video from “escaping” the corporate walls is critical to preserving sensitive information. Some solutions provide “short-lived URLs” that prevent unauthorized video sharing. Cultivate a video-based culture by starting small — pick one depart-ment or region to be the test unit for rolling out more aggressive use of video, and promote their success to other groups to gain alignment and traction. Having a video management and distribution platform that delivers deep analytics on video discovery, usage, and consump-tion gives you data to convince the skeptics. A SaaS model for video management and delivery solutions pro-vides a highly attractive total cost of ownership, while providing the reliability and flexibility traditional software models offer. With SaaS, you always run the most current version of the application, and there is never a need to worry about hardware, bandwidth, operating systems, storage space, etc. These solutions can often integrate with your existing infrastructure. Using video helps employees absorb and remember key messages. A strong video culture is one that encourages video creation, and at the same time reduces the actual and perceived costs of video production. Video allows the organization to share a very consistent message across a very large and geographically diverse organiza-tion. Once a culture is established for creating video, the ability to quickly find relevant information is vital to creating widespread adoption of video within an organization. Having a centralized, searchable video database allows employees to access the infor-mation companies have spent valuable resources to create. TEL Stuart Patterson is President and Chief Operating Officer at RAMP. Stuart is an experienced business leader and consultant who has led or advised leaders of early/mid-stage ventures in a variety of markets, including multimedia and video services, mobile apps and advertising, online/internet apps, telephony services, VoIP, speech recognition and synthesis, biometrics, identity manage-ment, RFID, natural antimicrobials, solar energy and energy efficiency. Connect Stuart Patterson 16 Submit your Articles Excellence Essentials presented by HR.com | 01.2015


Technology Enabled Learning Excellence Essentials January 2015
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