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Closing Japanese Candidates request, an apology for not being able to meet that request is the best course of action. Remember – candidates feel that their requests are reasonable, so an apology from the employer, combined with a sincere desire to work with the candidate, is the best approach. After said apology, rather than ask the candidate if he/she will accept less money, ask if he/she would like to ‘see’ what package the company can provide, and let the candidate judge for him/herself. Pushing candidates to accept an offer lower than the candidates’ desired offer amount can be seen as a pressure tactic and lead to resentment. On the other hand, by simply ‘presenting’ the offer that the employer can provide, this generates an atmosphere of good faith negotiation and sincere desire to hire the candidate; thereby creating a positive environment for the new employee should he/she join. 7) If the candidate tries to negotiate a higher offer, if the employer has indeed provided the best possible offer, the company can effec-tively walk away. Lastly, regarding deadlines for prospective employees to accept an offer, one week to accept a verbal offer is a reasonable amount of time for all sides in Japan, though this one week should be to accept a verbal offer rather than a written offer. Written offers matching a candidate’s desired compensation package should not be provided without verbal acceptance first, as it runs the risk of a candidate using a written offer to renegotiate with their current firm or other potential employers. While this is uncommon in Japan, it is not completely unheard of either. Of course, exceptions exist in many recruitment processes, and for the most difficult to find strategic hires, some additional concessions may need to be made on behalf of the employer. For example, it is important to keep in mind that many candidates forgo sizable one-off retirement payments when leaving their current employer, which can often be remedied by providing signing bonuses to prospective employees. As well, non-Japanese employers commonly need to accommodate for socially acceptable long notice periods, which can be as long as two to three months, though typically just one. We also cannot forget that after acceptance of an offer, proper attention should be paid to assisting the candidates during the resignation process, where the majority of late-stage falloffs occur. That said, by following the above steps, your company can simplify the offering process, leading to increased numbers of motivated hires, resulting in greater success for your business in Japan. RPO Jason Hatchell is the managing director of J-Source Corporation, an affiliate of MRINetwork. Hatchell has over 15 years of Japanese-based recruitment ex-perience and is an expert on cross-cultural issues between Japan and the West. Visit mrijsource.com Connect Jason Hatchell Follow @MRINetwork Would like to Comment? Please Click Here. 14 Submit your Articles Talent Acquisition Excellence Essentials presented by HR.com | 12.2015


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