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A Lost Sale Does Not Equal Death Risk of missing something important versus being able to do best In a course I attended years ago, a seminar instructor said that if you’re in sales, for example, and you’re overly focused on making this one sale, you’re not going to be at your best. The prospect can feel your anxiety. Why would you be so anxious about a particular sale? Subconsciously, the presenter said, too many people unconsciously contemplate a string of potential disasters. If they don’t make this sale, they might not make quota and their income will suffer. By not having considerable earnings, they may have to do without. Their spouse might be upset. Their children may go wanting. If other sales prospects fall through, they could lose their job. It might be hard to find another job, and even if they do, they could lose that one. Then, they could be in dire financial straits. They could lose their home. They could lose their company benefits. Their net worth might drop. As a result of this, they might fall ill. They might not have the funds to take care of themselves, and then they might die. In other words, amazingly, many sales professionals, as well as others in a wide variety of other industries, approach a current opportunity with the subconscious mind set that if they are not successful at this particular juncture, it leads to death. On Call 24/7? The propensity, of many people today, to be available for every possible phone call, voice message, text message, and instant message is no different from the sales professional’s dilemma which I just described. Missing a phone call does not equal death. Missing an opportunity is not the end of the world – even missing a big contract because the inquirer went to the next party on the list. Conversely, what is the toll taken on you for being available 24/7? How effective have your solutions been for clients when you are not able to focus on the task at hand, offer your complete and undivided attention, and hence do your best work? As we proceed into an ever faster future of greater technological capability, the risk of missing something important versus being able to do our best work will become a larger issue for more of the populace, most of the time. You Set the Parameters It’s vital to establish parameters now as to when we will maintain ‘an open door policy’ of being accessible via electronic communication, and when we will safeguard our ability to focus and concentrate by removing, or at least limiting, such intrusions. You owe it to yourself to have quiet, uninterrupted stretches throughout the day and the week when you can think, evaluate, and make the kinds of decisions that a person of your experience, talents, and capabilities is capable of effectively executing. SSE By Jeff Davidson Jeff Davidson, MBA, CMC, aka “The Work-life Balance Expert” offers keynote presentations and workshops on a creating work-life balance, managing the pace with grace, and thriving in a hyper-accelerated world. He has spoken to Fortune 50 companies such as Lockheed and IBM, and to American Express, Westinghouse, America Online, and Wells Fargo. Jeff is also the author of Simpler Living, Breathing Space, and Dial it Down, Live it Up. Follow @JeffDavidson Connect Jeff Davidson 10 Submit your Articles sales and service excellence essentials presented by HR.com | 10.2014


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