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Strategic Account Management “Just as the Greeks had a strategy and execute against a plan, strategic account teams should stay the course with their accounts. Strategic accounts take years to develop, as do strong relationships. and status. Strategic account teams must avoid being perceived as only looking to generate more sales. Trying to sell too much can hurt the customer relationship. A well-managed team is always on the lookout for opportunities, but they let them come naturally by being “present.” They focus on opportunities for impact or those that fit the team strategy. Sometimes it’s necessary to turn down low-impact or non-conforming opportunities. Throughout the relationship with a strategic account, strategic teams should strive for impact at both the enterprise and the individual level. Successful teams continually add value to the relationships and the customer’s organization. Focus on Impact and Stick with the Plan The last point of success for strategic accounts is the actual impact the team is making. If the team is not having an impact, it is not successful. It is valuable to formally measure and assess the trajectory of the account relationships, showing the impact and ROI. Winning teams establish measures for assessing penetration, e.g., year-over-year revenue growth and consistency, sales by divisions/business units, number, and quality of relationships at senior and mid-levels, including range across the organization, number of contacts and activities conducted at target account over the bi-annual measurement period. These are all important “dashboard” indicators that show success. Just as the Greeks had a strategy and executed against a plan, strategic account teams should stay the course with their accounts. Strategic accounts take years to develop, as do strong relationships. Teams that are well positioned in their accounts win customer confidence, expand their sphere of influence, and generate meaningful revenues for many years to come. Teams that maintain this position will be very hard to dislodge from their accounts. SSE Figure 2: Strategic Account Relationship Tool Basic Account Information Account Name (Parent Company) Industry Annual Revenue Total Employees Business Units Key Subsidiaries, Divisions, or Business Units Type of Business Annual Revenue Number of Employees Contacts Key Contacts Name/ Title/Phone/ email Corporate, Subsidiary, Division, or Business Unit Role and Influence in Organization (Decision Maker, Influencer) Relationship with Key Contact Activity Ledger “Above the Funnel Activities” Key Contact Division Title Phone Email SOV (Something of Value Offer) Last Contact Date Account History Prior Project Types Corporate, Subsidiary, Division, or Business Unit Approximate Revenue Key customer issues and business imperatives Business Issue Fact Base Focus (e.g., division, line of business, function) Possible Sales Implications Account Goals Overall Mid-Term, Long-Term Goals Goals for Next 12 Months Opportunities and Action Plan Repeat this section as many times as needed to capture all account opportunities and action plans Opportunity Opportunity Description Customer Issues Offering Potential Value to Account Estimated Revenue (by year) Key Account Contact(s) Opportunity Description Action Plan Steps Participants (and Customer) Expected Outcomes Timing and Status Summary of Opportunities and Status Opportunity Offering Estimated Fees (by year) Status Joseph DiMisa is a Senior Vice President in Sibson’s Atlanta office with over 20 years of experience working with telecommunications service providers and other organizations on all aspects of sales, marketing, and customer service effectiveness. He is the author of The Fisherman’s Guide to Selling, published in 2007. Email jdimisa@sibson.com Visit www.sibson.com Connect Joseph DiMisa Follow @JDiMisa_Sibson sales and service excellence essentials presented by HR.com | 03.2015 Submit your Articles 11


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