Page 11

SSE_DECEMBER2015

Storytelling For Business Leader Keep in mind that audiences appreciate honestly admitted mistakes and vulnerabilities. It helps them to see us as more human and paves the way for greater acceptance to directional changes that are being proposed. 3. Humorous Dialog  Too often, speakers try to get audiences to laugh by telling jokes or delivering overly rehearsed one-liners.  And they fail.  This is because speakers who try too hard, turn off audiences. Click here to view high resolution image Witness Senator Rubio’s first debate when, during his introductory remarks, he held up a bottle of water while saying that he’s made sure to bring water this time. (Click here to view video) You might recall this as a callback to the time when a drymouthed  Rubio embarrassed himself by reaching off camera for water during a nationally televised rebuttal to the State of the Union speech. I’m not sure what was harder to watch, the reach for water or the joke that didn’t get a laugh.   Nevertheless, humor does add spice to a presentation. But instead of finding it in canned or contrived situations, find it instead within the within dialog used to tell a story. Consider this example for instance:    “I started out working for a pretty tough boss.  He watched over everything I did and was quick to criticize. One day, he told me that he’d love to stop correcting me.  “You have my full permission,” I said.   This may not generate a guffaw, but it’s short, simple and more genuine than a rehearsed joke. 4. Your Story Journal  A relevant business story isn’t something that most of us can come up with spontaneously. For that reason, it’s important to keep a journal of some sort that will trigger stories that can be used across a variety of situations when they occur. You needn’t journal the whole story.  Referencing the story with a headline and a one or two-line gist will suffice.   Two sources can help you with this.  The first is Evernote. Evernote is a personal note curator that can be used either on-line or as a desktop application. Once you sign up, create a category called My Stories and tag each story you add to it. Tag your stories with words that will help you find them when needed.  For instance, you might have a story about a challenge over a particularly difficult challenge you once encountered. Simply write a couple sentences that will help jog your memory.  Then, tag the story with searchable words like, #solved problems, #unusual challenges, or #creative solutions.  Another journaling resource is Day One.  Day One is a journaling program that allows you to categorize and tag stories on the days they occur. Additionally, Day One will send notifications at certain times during the day with questions like, “What are the best, or worse memories from your childhood?” – questions that will inspire stories that you can briefly describe. I use Day One every morning as I think back on stories that occurred the previous day. It takes no longer than a minute to think back and write a headline and a tag. If you like, Day One also provides a way to diary events, emails, photos or anything else that you’d like to history. Click here to view high resolution image Finally, you can download a free e-book, written by Shawn Callahan and Mark Shenk, co-owners of Anecdote, a popular business storytelling training company. The book is entitled “Character Trumps Credentials.  It contains 170 questions that will help you recall stories that can be used, as needed. Provide your answers in Evernote or Day One for ready access.  5. The Unifying Theory of 2+2 Click here to view high resolution image This is something I garnered from a Ted Talk delivered by Andrew Stanton, the creator of Pixar’s Finding Nemo and Wall-E. The talk is entitled, The Clues To A Great Story. During this talk, Stanton explains that audiences don’t like to be told that 2+2 equals 4.  “When it comes to stories,” he says, “we like to figure out things for ourselves.” says. The Unifying Theory of 2+2 really underscores one of the fundamental reasons we are drawn to stories.  Imagine your reaction to the comedian who explains his punch lines or the screenwriter who includes an explanation of her story’s theme. Storytelling is less about explaining what something means and more about allowing audiences to decide for themselves. These five tools for using storytelling in a business context can be put to use in presentations, speeches or in everyday conversations with stakeholders and subordinates. Use them and you will soon see how more engaged, inspired and motivated your audiences will become. SSE Jim Signorelli is the President and Founder of Story-Lab. The programs he teaches have been used in 20 countries worldwide and for companies like Microsoft, Shell, Wrigley, IBM and many other Fortune 500s. Jim is an award winning author having two best sellers to his name. The latest, StoryBranding 2.0, is the winner of the International Book Award in Marketing and Advertising. He was recently voted “Top 50 Marketing Thought Leaders Over 50” by the readers of Branding Quarterly. Website www.story-lab.net Email jims@story-lab.net Connect Jim Signorelli The Metaphors Dictionary The Tall Lady and the World Class Speaking Clues to a Great Story Would like to Comment? Please Click Here. Ice Berg Sales and Service Excellence Essentials presented by HR.com | 12.2015 Submit your Articles 11


SSE_DECEMBER2015
To see the actual publication please follow the link above